When Entrepreneurs Meet: The Collective Governance of New Ideas

A book published with World Scientific.

When Entrepreneurs Meet: The Collective Governance of New Ideas challenges our understanding of how entrepreneurs crystallize opportunities surrounding new technologies. While innovation is the fundamental driver of growth and prosperity, how the earliest stages of entrepreneurship are governed remains elusive. This book creates a new, institutional approach to understanding entrepreneurship before emphasizing how entrepreneurs create governance structures to coordinate new knowledge resources.

Rather than the conventional view that entrepreneurship happens inside firms, this unique transaction-cost economics analysis of entrepreneurship suggests it might begin earlier in hybrid, polycentric self-governance structures, including the innovation commons. Allen explores and analyses various examples of these structures, including hackerspaces and the institutions coalescing around the development of the blockchain economy, along with the dynamics of how those institutions might collapse into firms. This new understanding of the entrepreneurial governance problem is also connected to contemporary questions about the purpose, scope, and application of innovation policy.

Book Contents

  1. Governing Entrepreneurial Discovery
  2. The Early Stage Entrepreneurial Problem
  3. Beyond Entrepreneurial Firms and Markets
  4. The Private Governance of Hackerspaces
  5. Developing the Blockchain Cryptoeconomy
  6. Rethinking Innovation Policy
  7. Conclusion

 

Regulation and Technological Change

Book chapter published in Australia’s Red Tape Crisis: The Causes and Costs of Over-Regulation (with Chris Berg)

Abstract: Blockchain technology enables entrepreneurs to develop new decentralised governance structures to coordinate human interaction and exchange. That is, blockchain enables exit from political-socioeconomic systems through new forms of property rights protection and enforcement. This chapter examines the economic problem facing entrepreneurs as they use blockchain to cryptosecede and develop the new governance structures of the cryptoeconomy. The analysis draws on institutional and new development economics, arguing that blockchain entrepreneurs face a private economic development problem over complementary ‘protective-tier’ institutional technologies (Leeson and Boettke 2009). This understanding of the parallels between territorial economic development and the cryptoeconomy development helps explain collaboration between blockchain entrepreneurs within governance structures such as hackathons and conferences (Allen 2017). These collaborative governance structures are entrepreneurial efforts of self-governed economic development of the cryptoeconomy.